The Pack 92 Advancement Ceremony

From the Blue & Gold Banquet, 8 February 1996

This ceremony is a combination of several that were found on other sites, reworked for our purposes. It was quite impressive. The "Ooh's" and "Ahh's" when Akela shot the arrows were well worth it.

Props: Drum, electric Campfire, Arrow of Light Candleholder, Spirit Candle, Red, Green, Yellow, and Blue poster paint, an arrow for each AOL Scout. A stack of hay bales with large bulls-eye target on it, about 20 feet away from the electric campfire (possitioned so that no body could possibly be behind it when the arrows are shot).

Setting: Cubmaster and Assistant Cubmaster at the ceremony table, AOL candleholder on table with candles not lit. Spirit of Scouting candle lit. Lights low, or spots on table. Drum beat in background. OA Scout in full Indian regallia, with archery bow over shoulder walks on stage near the "campfire".

CUBMASTER: (SIGN'S UP)
HEAR NOW THE TALE OF THE TRIBE OF WEBELOS AND THEIR GREAT CHIEFTAIN, AKELA.

ASSISTANT CUBMASTER: (Read dramatically and with feeling)
Many moons ago, a small boy sat outside his teepee watching the stars in the sky, and listening to the rustle of the trees in the night. Somewhere in the distance he could hear the call of the Bobcat, the Wolf, and the Bear. Close by was the sound of the ceremonial drum calling all braves of the tribe to the council ring. The boy listened and wished he could answer that call. Quick and as true as an arrow in flight, quiet as the hush of the night, to the beat of that ceremonial drum, before a great fire they gathered, awaiting Akela, their chief. Here in the great council fire ring, on top of the mountain, they met. Here too, they sought the help of the Great Spirit as they strived to do their duty. Here they met Chief Akela, and awaited his words.

Now with the last "boom" of the great drum, all was silent. The night was still. The great ceremonial fire was lit and it began to light up the night. As the fire grew and grew ever larger, the tom/tom started slowly and set the rhythm. Akela stepped into the ring as the tom/tom beat first low and slow and then like thunder. Akela danced and with his movement told of his life. He told of the strength of his father, the one they called the Arrow of Light. He told of how his father taught him the signs of the tribe; how to make a bow and let arrow fly true to its target. [At this point the narrator pauses. Akela shoots an arrow into the target across the stage, one for each AOL Scout.] Akela obediently followed the Arrow of Light and gained great knowledge. Akela learned that the arrow for which his father was named was one that pointed upward, truly to the Eagle so high above.

Akela's dance showed how he, as a young brave, was trusted to set out into the forest. There he met the wolf who taught him the ways of the wild life, of the ground, of the tracks, and ways to find food. He next faced the Bear and learned the meaning of courage and the importance of being brave. and with this akela stopped his dance!

Akela, the wise, had closed his dance and presented the sign of the tribe and all of the tribe did likewise. No one spoke until Akela said: "Our tribe can only be strong when the boys of the tribe are strong. The future is hidden, but if we are courageous and brave; if we teach our boys truth and knowledge, to aim high like the eagle, to be fair, our great tribe will continue to be strong.

CUBMASTER:
My friends, you are like that small Indian boy wishing that you can answer the call of the great ceremonial drum and be members of the tribe. Every boy who joins Cub Scouting, whatever his age, first earns the BOBCAT badge by learning the Cub Scout Promise, Sign, Salute, Handshake, the meaning of Webelos, the Law of the Pack, and the Cub Scout Motto, 'Do Your Best'.

[As each of the above requirements are read, the Assistant Cubmaster might recite or demonstrate it]

Bobcat Ceremony

ASSISTANT CUBMASTER:
Would (INSERT NAMES) and their parents please come forward and stand here facing the audience. [Assistant Cubmaster escort the Scouts and their parents to the stand next to the ceremony table, facing the audience, with the parents standing behind their Scout.]

CUBMASTER:
Scouts, as you gaze up at the night sky, you will see a constellation of stars to the north called the Big Dipper. The big star is the North Star. For many years man has used these stars as a guide to show them the way as they traveled. As you join Cub Scouts you are starting a trip. You will experience adventures and excitement, meet new friends and learn new skills. However, as you begin this trip you need a 'North Star' to guide you. The 'North Star' is Akela ... Akela can be your parents, your Den Leader, even me your Cubmaster. It is our responsibility to help you along the way.

I ask you parents and our Den Leaders: Will you accept the responsibility to be 'Akela' for these Bobcat Scouts, to help guide them along the Cub Scouting trail? [Wait for them to mumble something like, "I do".]

Now Scouts, join me in reciting the Cub Scout Promise and Law of the Pack. Cub Scout Sign...etc...Scout sign two. [Walk in front of the Scouts and face them.]

Scouts, you have now started your own Scouting Trail by earning the Bobcat badge. [Present Bobcat badge to parents. Assistant Cubmaster, place the new Bobcat Scouts appropriate neckerchief around his neck.]

Parents, you may pin the badge on your Scout. Place the metal pin on the left shirt pocket flap upside down. Scouts, when you have performed your first good deed, you may turn the pin right side up and then present it to your mother. Congratulations! You may be seated.

Wolf Ceremony

CUBMASTER
Just as when Akela first went into the forest and learned from the WOLF, a Cub Scout in the second grade begins working on the requirements for the Wolf badge. Cub Scouts learn about Akela and the story of Mowgli and his survival in the Jungle. When a boy has completed 12 Achievements on the Wolf Trail, in such areas as physical fitness, exploring the world around him, fixing, building, collecting, safety, our flag, our family and our Duty to God, he receives his WOLF badge.

ASSISTANT CUBMASTER:
Would (INSERT NAMES) and their parents please come forward and stand here facing the audience. [Assistant Cubmaster escort the Scouts and their parents to the stand next to the ceremony table, facing the audience, with the parents standing behind their Scout.]

CUBMASTER:
You've completed all the requirements for your Wolf badge and have moved along the Cub Scout trail. Receive now the mark of the Wolf, a Red mark, symbolizing strength and valor.

[Assistant Cubmaster, mark each Scout with RED face paint]

It is my pleasure to award your Wolf badge to your parents, who have been your Akela in completing these requirements. Parents please award this badge to your son and congratulate him on a 'Job Well Done'.

Parents, you may pin the badge on your Scout. Place the metal pin on the left shirt pocket flap upside down. Scouts, when you have performed your first good deed, you may turn the pin right side up and then present it to your mother. Congratulations! You may be seated.

Wolf Arrow Points

CUBMASTER:
We also have some boys who have earned their Wolf Gold & Silver Arrow points. Would the following Scouts and their parents please come forward to receive them. [Assistant Cubmaster escort the Scouts and their parents to the stand next to the ceremony table, facing the audience, with the parents standing behind their Scout.]

[Cubmaster awards the arrow points to the Scouts, announcing the names and number of Arrow Points as he hands them to the parents.] Let us now congratulate these scouts on a job well done. [Applause.]

Bear Ceremony

CUBMASTER:
When the scout reaches third grade he begins working from the big bear book. Just as Akela met the BEAR with courage, the Scout walks the BIG BEAR TRAIL. On that trail he finds and conquers 12 challenging achievements in the categories of God, Country, Family and Self. He then receives his bear badge.

ASSISTANT CUBMASTER:
Would (INSERT NAMES) and their parents please come forward and stand here facing the audience. [Assistant Cubmaster escort the Scouts and their parents to the stand next to the ceremony table, facing the audience, with the parents standing behind their Scout.]

CUBMASTER:
You've completed all the requirements for your Bear badge and have moved along the Cub Scout trail. Receive now the mark of the Bear, a Green mark, symbolizing nature and your growing knowledge of the world around you. [Assistant Cubmaster, mark each boy with GREEN face paint]

It is my pleasure to award your Bear badge to your parents, who have been your Akela in completing these requirements. Parents please award this badge to your son and congratulate him on a 'Job Well Done'.

Parents, you may pin the badge on your Scout. Place the metal pin on the left shirt pocket flap upside down. Scouts, when you have performed your first good deed, you may turn the pin right side up and then present it to your mother. Congratulations! You may be seated.

Bear Arrow Points

CUBMASTER:
We also have some boys who have earned their Bear Gold Arrow points. Would the following Scouts and their parents please come forward to receive them. [Assistant Cubmaster escort the Scouts and their parents to the stand next to the ceremony table, facing the audience, with the parents standing behind their Scout.]

[Cubmaster awards the arrow points to the Scouts, announcing the names and number of Arrow Points as he hands them to the parents.]

Let us now congratulate these scouts on a job well done. [Applause.]

Webelos Rank Ceremony

CUBMASTER:
In fourth and fifth grade, the Scout is brought into the tribe of Webelos. He enters a Webelos Den, some with names like the Scorpions or Cobras. The boy prepares himself for Boy Scouting. He works on 20 different activity badges from five skill groups: Physical, mental, outdoor, community, and technical skills. After three months in the Webelos Den and after earning three activity badges including Fitness, and learning about the Boy Scout ways, he earns his Webelos Rank Badge.

ASSISTANT CUBMASTER:
There are Cub Scouts among us tonight who have earned their Webelos Rank. Would (INSERT NAMES) and their parents please come forward and stand here facing the audience. [Assistant Cubmaster escort the Scouts and their parents to the stand next to the ceremony table, facing the audience, with the parents standing behind their Scout.]

CUBMASTER:
You've completed all the requirements for your Webelos badge and have moved along the Cub Scout trail. Receive now the mark of the Webelos, a Blue mark, symbolizing vigilance, perseverance, and justice.

[Assistant Cubmaster, mark each boy with BLUE face paint]

It is my pleasure to award your Webelos badge to your parents, who have been your Akela in completing these requirements. Parents please award this badge to your son and congratulate him on a 'Job Well Done'.

Parents, you may pin the badge on your Scout. Place the metal pin on the left shirt pocket flap upside down. Scouts, when you have performed your first good deed, you may turn the pin right side up and then present it to your mother. Congratulations! You may be seated.

Webelos Activity Pins Ceremony

CUBMASTER:
We also have some Scouts who have earned Webelos Activity Badges. Would the following Scouts and their parents please come forward to receive them. [Assistant Cubmaster escort the Scouts and their parents to the stand next to the ceremony table, facing the audience, with the parents standing behind their Scout.]

[Cubmaster awards the Activity Badges to the Scouts, announcing the names and which Activity Badges are being awarded as he hands them to the parents.]

Let us now congratulate these scouts on a job well done. [Applause.]

Arrow of Light Ceremony

CUBMASTER:
The final and highest rank of Cub Scouting is the Arrow of Light. To earn it a boy must be a member of his Den for at least six months since turning 10 years old and have earned the Webelos Rank. He must have earned the Fitness, Readyman, and Citizen Activity Badges and five more for a total of eight. He must know the Boy Scout Oath and Scout Law from memory as well as the Boy Scout slogan, motto, sign and salute. He must have participated in a Webelos overnight campout or a Webelos day hike. He must have visited a Boy Scout troop with his parents and den and taken part in a boy scout outdoor activity.

ASSISTANT CUBMASTER:
There are Webelos Scouts among us tonight who have earned Cub Scouting's highest award. Would (INSERT NAMES) and their parents please come forward and stand here facing the audience. [Assistant Cubmaster escort the Scouts and their parents to the stand next to the ceremony table, facing the audience, with the parents standing behind their Scout.]

CUBMASTER:
The arrow of light is much more difficult to obtain than a belt loop, an activity badge or even one of the other rank patch. To obtain this award these scouts have met a number of requirements, including completion of eight activity badges, participation in camps, hikes and boy scout activities, the memorization of the Scout Oath and the Scout Law, and the commitment to live by these principles. Webelos scouts will you please stand at attention, salute your audience and recite the Scout Oath and Scout Law in unison. [Cubmaster step to the front to face the Scouts, salute and lead]

On my honor I will do my best: To do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; To help other people at all times; To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight.

A Scout is Trustworthy, Loyal, Helpful, Friendly, Courteous, Kind, Obedient, Cheerful, Thrifty, Brave, Clean, Reverent

Thank you. As you can see on the candleholder, the Arrow of Light symbol is made up of an arrow which points the way to a good life and a rising sun which symbolizes the constant new challenges provided by Scouting and by life itself. The seven candles in the emblem represent the seven rays in the Arrow of lLght symbol you see before you.

ASSISTANT CUBMASTER:
[Cubmaster lights the first candle]
This first ray represents Wisdom. Having wisdom doesn't mean that a person is smarter than others. It means that he uses what he knows to live a better life.

[Cubmaster lights the second candle]
This ray represents Courage. Courage does not mean you have no fear of danger. It means that you can face danger despite your fear.

[Cubmaster lights the third candle]
The third ray stands for Self Control. Self Control means being able to stop when you have had enough of something and being able to choose your own path instead of merely following others.

[Cubmaster lights the fourth candle]
The fourth ray stand for Justice. Justice means being fair with others we play and work with, regardless of who they are.

[Cubmaster lights the fifth candle]
The fifth ray represents Faith. Faith includes belief in God, and in things we cannot see, but feel are true.

[Cubmaster lights the sixth candle]
This candle represents Hope. Hope means to look forward to good things you believe will happen. You hope for better things tomorrow, but at the same time you work hard today to make them happen.

[Cubmaster lights the seventh candle]
The last candle and the last ray of the sun of the arrow of light symbol stands for Love. There are many kinds of love. Love of family, home, fellow men, God, and country. Every kind of love is important for a full and happy life.

CUBMASTER:
You will find that living by these seven virtues can lead to a happy life. The Arrow of Light is a significant achievement. It is recognized as such by the Boy Scouts of America. When you become a Boy Scout, you continue to wear the Arrow of Light on your uniform. When you become an adult leader, you wear a square knot which represents the Arrow of Light on your uniform.

You've completed all the requirements for your Arrow of Light badge and have completed the Cub Scout trail. It is my pleasure to award you your Arrow of Light badge to your parents, who have been your Akela in completing these requirements. Parents please award this badge to your son and congratulate him on a 'Job Well Done'.

[Assistant Cubmaster award boys their certificates, and present the parents with the Arrow of Light badge. Parents pin it on the boys. Then present the mother's pin to the boy and have him pin his mother or father]

Receive now the mark of the Arrow of Light, a Yellow mark, symbolizing light from the blazing sun above us, lighting our way through life. [Assistant Cubmaster, mark each boy with YELLOW face paint]

The AOL Charge

ASSISTANT CUBMASTER:
In Boy Scouts, when they have an Eagle Court of Honor, a charge or challenge is made to the new Eagle Scout. Tonight, I want to offer such a challenge to each of you. You have now achieved the highest rank in Cub Scouts. I challenge each of you to continue to live by the ideals you have learned in Cub Scouts, especially the Cub Scout motto: "DO YOUR BEST".

I challenge each of you to continue your high level of achievement in Boy Scouts.

I challenge each of you to look at the Arrow of Light badge and think about what it represents:

  • The sun shedding its light on all that we do. A reminder that you should be a light for those around you.
  • The seven rays of the sun representing the seven days of the week. A reminder that you should do your best every day.
  • The arrow which is symbolic of everything which is straight and true. Just as you should be straight and true in your lives.

I challenge each of you to follow where that Arrow of Light points:

  • Forward on the trail of Boy Scout ranks.
  • Upward to higher challenges.

I challenge each of you to soar to great heights and obtain the Eagle Scout Award.

Now as a symbol to remember this occasion, I give to each of you, one of the arrows that Chief Akela shot into the target. [Go to the target, pull out arrows, and hand them to each AOL Scout].

Congratulations and good luck. Parents, Guests and Cub Scouts of Pack 92, would you please join with me in giving these boys a standing ovation for achieving the highest award in Cub Scouting.


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